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AUTHOR’S MOUSEHOLE FAMILY INSPIRES NEW CHILDRENS BOOK

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BBC Cornwall | Cornwall
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BBC News | UK | World Edition
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AUTHOR’S MOUSEHOLE FAMILY INSPIRES NEW CHILDRENS BOOK

Literature




Debut novel set in Mousehole no 2 on Kindle bestseller list

The picturesque harbour of Mousehole takes centre stage in a new children’s book for 9 – 12 year olds, Callum Fox and the Mousehole Ghost. The book, published by Woodside White Books in June, went straight in at number two in Amazon’s Kindle bestsellers list of children’s historical fiction.

The story follows Callum Fox, a 12 year old boy from London, who visits Cornwall to spend the summer with his grandparents. To his horror he finds the place haunted by Jim, the ghost of a WWII evacuee. The story unfolds through alternating time-slip chapters, mixing a humorous contemporary story with a WWII adventure. Both stories come together when Callum, Jim the ghost and Callum’s friend, Sophie find themselves trapped underground at Geevor Tin Mine.

The author, AC Hatter, knows the area well. ‘When I had the idea for the novel I just knew it had to be set in Mousehole. It’s the perfect location for a summer holiday adventure. It was important to me to ground the story in a real place, one that was special to me and my family. I think it gives the story more credibility and it’s an opportunity to share a little of Mousehole’s rich past with a wider audience.’

Hatter’s family farmed near Penzance for many years and ran a B&B in Mousehole in the 1940s. She researched both the WWII and current story lines thoroughly and wrote some of the manuscript whilst staying at the Ship Inn. Hatter is returning to the region between the 14th and 16th July to talk about the book and meet with local book sellers and readers.

Hatter, 45, is married with two children and lives in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire. She works as an HR consultant and is currently writing the second book in the series. Although Callum Fox and the Mousehole Ghost is Hatter’s first children’s novel she has had other fiction published. Fay Weldon described one of her earlier stories as ‘thoughtful, moving and simply written, seizes an idea and carries it through. It puts a shape upon ordinary human experience and makes it un-ordinary, which is what the best writing does.’
Margaret Graham, said ‘Callum Fox is a fabulous, funny, feisty character, who takes us on a roller-coaster of a ride around Cornwall. Read and Enjoy!’

Callum Fox and the Mousehole Ghost is available in paperback from Amazon and all good bookshops, and as an eBook on Kindle, kobo and iBooks.

Find out more at www.achatter.co.uk
Amanda Hatter, amanda.hatter@compbenhr.com, 01494 680400 / 07786 933088

CALLUM FOX AND THE MOUSEHOLE GHOST – Synopsis
Callum Fox’s summer holiday in Cornwall isn’t working out quite as he’d expected. His Grandad’s turned out to be a miserable old git and Sophie, the girl he met on the train to Penzance, seems to view him as more of a liability than anything else.
However, his time in Mousehole starts to get a whole lot more interesting when he meets Jim, the ghost of a World War II evacuee.
Seventy years separate Callum and Jim, but as their stories unfold Callum realises they have more in common than anyone could have imagined, and that some secrets last a lifetime…

CALLUM FOX AND THE MOUSEHOLE GHOST is aimed at children aged 9 – 12. It is set in two time periods. The historical story line follows Jim White, an evacuee, sent to Mousehole to billet with Bob Fox and his family. Jim and Bob witness a German plane crash which triggers a string of events culminating in Jim’s death at the age of 12.

Meanwhile the contemporary story line keeps the reader firmly rooted in a lighter, fast paced adventure, following Callum Fox (also aged 12), who travels down from London to spend the summer with his Grandad – the same Bob Fox seventy years on. The two stories are told in alternating chapters, clearly defined and intertwined.

Callum and the ghost of Jim, try to convince Sophie from the Mousehole B&B that Callum can see ghosts, but in the process Sophie gets badly injured at Geevor Tin Mine and her life hangs in the balance. Callum and the ghosts have to work together to save her.

Sophie’s experience proves to her, and Grandad Bob, that Callum really can see ghosts. Bob is able to discuss everything that happened to him and Jim seventy years previously, bringing closure to him, and forming a bond between Callum and his grandad.

Evacuees are studied in most UK primary schools and CALLUM FOX AND THE MOUSEHOLE GHOST supports the history syllabus, whilst also having the added contemporary feel of a story about children with mobile phones and Facebook accounts.

The story ties in with the 70th anniversary of the war, 75th anniversary of Operation Pied Piper (the mass evacuation of 3 million children from London in September 2014) and also references the 1981 Penlee Lifeboat disaster and Cornish tin mining.

Both stories are set in the beautiful fishing village of Mousehole, Cornwall with action occurring in Geevor Tin Mine and Penzance. CALLUM FOX AND THE MOUSEHOLE GHOST would make a fantastic summer holiday read for children holidaying in Cornwall – or anywhere!

 

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